(Similarity) DOES TECHNOLOGY ALWAYS PROMOTE LEARNER AUTONOMY?INVESTIGATING UNIVERSITY TEACHER'S ATTITUDE

Kamilah, Nur (2017) (Similarity) DOES TECHNOLOGY ALWAYS PROMOTE LEARNER AUTONOMY?INVESTIGATING UNIVERSITY TEACHER'S ATTITUDE. Universitas Negeri Malang.

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Abstract

One of the most highly anticipated benefits of the use of technology for language teaching is its role in enhancing learning autonomy. Some scholars believe that autonomy contributes to effective and lifelong learning, making it one of the goals in learning. By using technology, both teacher and student can have access to various learning resources and materials which may promote autonomy. The Internet is one of the most widely used sources, for it could help teachers access authentic materials for their students, while students could also learn the language at their own paces. However, reports have shown that technology also discourages students to be more autonomous. It has been reported that unrestricted use of technology, without proper guidance and control from teachers, would not make students more responsible for their own learning, making it not favored by some teachers. To sum up, there are both benefits and constraints in the use of technology in achieving learning autonomy. Reacting to such a dilemma, it is necessary to learn the beliefs of English teachers regarding the use of technology in their classes and to which direction it leads to. The present study attempts to search for the answer from the English lecturers in Muhammadiyah University of Jember.

Item Type: Peer Review
Subjects: 300 Social Science
Divisions: Faculty of Teaching and Education Science > Department of English Literature Education (S1 - Undergraduate Thesis)
Depositing User: Kamilah Nur
Date Deposited: 08 Jan 2020 01:50
Last Modified: 08 Jan 2020 01:51
URI: http://repository.unmuhjember.ac.id/id/eprint/3300

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